Content Strategy for Law Firms

Do you work at a law firm and experience the daily dilemma of trying to keep a digital presence fresh, lively, relevant and useful across dozens of channels?

Content strategy can seem like something entirely different depending on which part of it you touch.

You too? Then why don’t you join my LinkedIn group!

Content Strategy for Law Firms is a networking group for the in-house law firm worker bees who conceive, plan, create, produce, govern, manage and analyze content across a variety of media.

The goal of the group is to learn about the mindset, tools and processes of content strategy so that we get better at our jobs – and maybe, eventually begin to build  cultures of content within our firms.

Why Content Strategy for Law Firms? Why now?

I have long wanted to start a networking group for law firm website folks, and had identified “content strategy” as the missing link among the in-house groups I’m active in.  And frankly, the missing link in many law firms.

In the meantime, my peers Kristin Vasilj and Tina Johns had also been discussing the lack of focused networking opportunities for legal industry people in roles like ours that cross communications, strategy, technology, marketing and business development. So we came together to form this group.

Website creation and content maintenance – done properly – breaks down silos within an organization. From this process springs the idea of  content strategy which plans for the creation, publication, and governance of useful, usable content – and requires people with a diverse skillset across an organization. Content strategy requires both technical and editorial skills, along with a healthy dose of courage, influence, endurance, ambition and vision.

Content strategy isn’t a new idea. Rachel Lovinger wrote her influential piece on content strategy in 2007 – The Philosphy of Data. And Christina Halvorson – the Martha Stewart of the discipline – has written an excellent book on the topic.

Heck, even I held a content strategy role back in 2000, so the idea has been around for awhile. But look how much the web has changed since then. Many of us have gone from minding a single website of a few hundred pages, to overseeing multiple websites comprising thousands of pages. Add to that multiple social media channels including blogs, client intranets and extranets, the firm intranet and syndication channels, plus the complicating factor of globally distributed teams – and it’s no wonder we need content strategy now!

So let’s get together and talk about content. In the words of Christina Halvorson, it’s time to…

Stop pretending content is somebody else’s problem. Take up the torch for content strategy. Learn it. Practice it. Promote it. It’s time to make content matter.

written by 

Molly Porter on Twitter

Molly Porter on LinkedIn

Molly Porter on Facebook

Will LinkedIn revolutionize law firm publishing?

Last April, I had the pleasure of sitting down with about 40 of my firm’s lawyers for one-on-one strategy sessions on using LinkedIn. The most commonly asked question was “what can I do with it?” – often from lawyers who had amassed 200, 300, even 1000 connections apiece.

Wake up! It’s time to make the content!

LinkedIn began answering this question last March with LinkedIn Today – a branded newspaper-like application that provides news tailored to your industry, interests and connections. Since then, LinkedIn has launched many additional significant enhancements, including:

  • iPad app – April 26
  • Targeted company updates – June 19
  • Homepage redesign – July 16
  • Profile page redesign – August 20
  • Notifications – September 5
  • Company page redesign – September 6
  • Endorsements –  September 25

These enhancements address user experience, engagement, sharing, content consumption – even gamification (try to make just one endorsement – I dare you!) None of these enhancements, however, addressed publishing and content creation – until last week which saw LinkedIn launch a blogging platform built directly into the profile page.

Right now this feature is limited to about 150 thought leaders and influencers like Richard Branson and President Obama, but I fully expect it to be rolled out to all users eventually.

This is a real game changer for LinkedIn –  for law firm web publishing.

First, I predict that this feature will make LinkedIn as engaging as any other social site – or news platform site (like Forbes.com or HBR.com) for that matter. While LinkedIn users currently spend an average of 18 minutes a month on the site (accepting connections requests and nothing more, like the lawyers in my firm), LinkedIn has no trouble generating revenue via its recruiting solutions. Imagine how much more they can sell (and charge) when people are even more engaged and spending time discovering content and following thought leaders.

Second, this new feature should cause a real shift in the way we marketers think about the lawyer-authors in our firms. Suddenly, all our blessed and branded publishing channels – blogs, microsites, the firm website and email alerts, especially – are competing with a site that has 175 million users, and on which every one of our lawyers probably already had a presence.

If a lawyer wants to publish content – and getting it done via marketing isn’t lightening fast and easy peasy – which do you think he or she is going to choose? What’s better – seamlessly delivering your thoughts to an audience of 500 qualified readers that you know personally, or following established firm protocol and procedure which can be byzantine and bureaucratic? One of these options looks like an easy button to me.

It seems likely that a blogging feature on LinkedIn could be yet another nail in the coffin of  blogging as predicted by Adrian Lurssen. But could it also contribute to the end of the law firm website? After all, biographies are the center of the law firm web universe and LinkedIn has pretty much duplicated and improved every feature of the lawyer bio at this point. Maybe? Maybe not. But it’s an interesting question.

Regardless, if  we are the smart digital marketers that I know we are, we will include LinkedIn among the channels that we must COPE with – Create Once, Publish Everywhere – so that our lawyers and our brands both can benefit from the efforts involved in creating great thought leadership content.

written by 

Molly Porter on Twitter

Molly Porter on LinkedIn


17,000 Morgan Stanley Brand Amplifiers Can’t Be Wrong

The rollout of Morgan Stanley’s social media program to all 17,000 of its financial advisers made big social media news over the last two weeks. In case you hadn’t heard:

Bird in a cage

MSSB’s social media policy restricts and protects – but it also amplifies.

Morgan Stanley’s risk management committee has given the go-ahead for all of the retail brokerage’s financial advisers to use [Twitter and LinkedIn]. The approval follows a year-long trial in which 600 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney (MSSB) advisers were allowed to use the sites. (FT.com)

It’s hard to fathom that until a couple of weeks ago, LinkedIn and Twitter were completely off limits to all but 600 MSSB advisers – but that’s the restrictive regulatory environment they’re in.

So the conception and implementation of this program is a massive event in the financial services industry, even if it seems a few years behind everybody else.

How has this news of MSSB’s social media program been received? The blogosphere has been largely negative, calling MSSB’s program totally boring and saying it totally misses the point of social media – at the same time virtually ignoring the rigorous regulatory environment in which Morgan Stanley operates and the sheer magnitude of the program.

But maybe it’s a perfect model for Biglaw?

First, a few observations about the program.

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